Du Hast (English Translation) lyrics by Rammstein, 14 meanings. Du Hast (English Translation) explained, official 2020 song lyrics | LyricsMode.com
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Rammstein – Du Hast (English Translation) lyrics
You
You have
You have me

You have me to say
You have me to say
And
I did not obey

Will you until death does sever
Be
upright to her forever

Never

Will you 'til
death be her rider
Her lover too, to stay inside her

Never

* When Till is just saying "Du hast," it sounds as if he could either be saying "Du hast" (you have) or "Du hasst" (you hate). This is to give the song a double meaning, even though the official lyrics say "Du hast."

** There is another sort of double meaning here. If the line is read as "Tod der Scheide" it would be "until the death of the vagina" and not "until death, which would seperate" ("Tod, der scheide"). The whole song is a play on German wedding vows (Wollen Sie einander lieben und achten und die Treue halten bis dass der Tod euch scheidet? - Do you want to love and respect each other and to remain faithful, until death seperates you?). Instead of answering with "Ja," Till says "Nein," finally answering the question he said nothing to in the beginning.
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Corrected by shenannergans

Du Hast (English Translation) meanings Post my meaning

  • U
    + 47
    Unregistered
    These lyrics are totally correct!
    Everybody who says they aren't probably have no idea of the german language. I'm completely amazed how you think your opinion matters/.
    The english version of this song is exactly what it is, a version. Not a translated version.
    Would they litterly translate it, it wouldn't make sense, since the german wordplay is gone.
    So, to answer: du hast mich does not mean "you have (asked) me" or "you hate me". It means both.
    God, do people outside europe even get lessons about poetry, wordplay, language etc.?
    3 replies
  • U
    + 32
    Unregistered
    The misconception is by media at large. I have both the German version and the English version of "Du Hast" (Du Hasst), the song explicitly states in clear English on the English version "You Hate Me", and when further listening is done, the entire song is speaking of 1st person rebelling against oppression of 2nd person whom is target of the word "du" (you - as used to one you refuse to acknowledge, rather than sei, which refers to one whom is known and acknowledged).

    If sei is getting married then the 2nd person would be addressed as "sei hast mich". Yet the song in German uses "du hast mich" which states clearly the 2nd person is no friendly individual, therefore. There is no double meaning and furthermore. Any non-English word, name, etc. Always get doubled down into English pronunciation. Hence "Du hasst mich" gets one's removed in hasst producing "du hast miche", as I stated. Misconception due to media at large.

    "You...
    You hate...
    You hate me...
    You hate me to say (reason with you)
    And I did not obey (I stood my ground)

    Will you until killed (leave this place)
    Be in support of "germany's (3rd riech) oppressive reign forever...

    Nooooooo (in English, Rammstein stated "NEVER!")

    Will you until killed be her (her is the 3rd reich) armed forces
    her supporter (not a defector), to remain inside her (or imprisoned for not complying)

    Nooooooo (in English, Rammstein stated "NEVER!")"

    Point is that this song is absolutely not about a woman. It is purely anti oppressive against one who hurt so many, Rammstein also has song "Hitler", "Links 2 3 4", etc. All about oppression and how it hurts many.

    Hard ideology of sie vs du. A man on trial, standing accused of murder, as he cries, self defense. Sir, before the attack, did the person who attacked you say anything? Ummm, yes he did, he said "you hate me". Ok, did you ever meet or know this person before the attack? No, I never saw the man before. Ok, when he came, what was the exact words he said? He looked at me and screamed "sie hasst miche!" and then came at me. So he spoke German? Yes sir, he spoke that, whether it is German or not, I do not know, but that is what he said.

    Well, sir, that is interesting, because if you never met the man before, he would have said "du hasst mich" instead of "sei hasst miche", and since he said "sei hasst mich", according to your testimony, we all know for fact, that you knew the person. So now we need to know why you say you never met when your testimony says by your words, you both knew each other.

    Song "Du Hast Mich" aka "Du hasst mich", is about oppression, not a idiotic man woman marriage.
    1 reply
  • U
    + 22
    Unregistered
    Du hasst mich means "you hate me," but according to the context of the song and the spelling of it, it means you have me. But this isn't even correct. German grammar is different than english, so the words du hast mich gefragt mean you have me in demand, or have asked me a question. Before you judge what something means, you have to understand vernacular and grammar. Example! When germans call each other crazy, they say "you have a bird. "
    1 reply
  • n
    + 12
    Neophyte
    Ok as a German I feel I need to clarify a bit, despite all the good comments.
    Because in general you only listen to a song without having the lyrics:

    "Du, du hast
    Du hast mich
    Du, du hast
    Du hast mich..."

    ...everybody in Germany would immediately assume he sings:

    "You, you hate
    You have me
    You, you hate
    You hate me"

    ...but then he goes on with:

    "Du hast mich gefragt
    Und ich hab nichts gesagt"

    ...and so it gets clear he doesn't mean "hate" but "have"...

    "You have asked me
    And I have said (answered) nothing"

    ... and that is it about a marriage promise!

    "Willst du bist der Tod euch scheidet
    Treu ihr sein für alle Tage?"

    "Will you until death does sever
    Be upright to her forever"

    Answer: "NOO!"
    Add your reply
  • U
    + 10
    Unregistered
    The top two voted here are correct (except the second one saying not about a man and a woman) Rammstein uses double meanings, and they are hard cases from eastern Deutschland and include right wing lyrics (but they are coy when asked about it), so this is a play on wedding vows - both as a couple and as being Deutsch and being wedded to Deutschland.
    Add your reply
  • U
    + 7
    Unregistered
    Ok, quick German lesson du is familiar, and Sie is formal. It would be du hast (you have) or du hasst (you hate). If he was going to talk to someone he didn't know he would say Sie haben or Sie hassen. Whether it is about wedding vows or absolute hate, most likely both, it is still a great song!
    Add your reply
  • U
    + 3
    Unregistered
    OK. Even though Rammstein is all about arbitrary lyrics and metaphors, I think this song is DEFINITELY about an arranged marriage that the narrator does not want to go through with. Till says wedding vows, and most people would respond with [I do]. However, he is saying [NEIN!], which to me signifies that he does not want to marry this woman.
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  • U
    + 1
    Unregistered
    After watching the video and listening to the song itself, it seems to me like it's a marriage or relationship that has for some reason fallen apart. The guy has a meeting with who he initially thinks are people out to hurt him and turn out to be his old buddies who ask him if he really intends on staying with her. Her murder, it seems is premeditated because when they all leave the barn he glances at his watch - soon after the car explodes, taking her with it. The fiery being in the barn is perhaps a metaphor - purging him of his commitment to her and being "reborn" as a new single man. Rammstein, it seems love to play with words and meanings to confuse the uninitiated. Still love their music, though. And this video could make a great story!
    Add your reply
  • w
    0
    willjones
    Oh my god, Rammstein and a double entendre. Who would have thunk it, NEVER. Pure poetry. LOL all the way. So I have to post 50 words. Double Entendre;
    A double entendre is a figure of speech or a particular way of wording that is devised to be understood in two ways, having a double meaning. Typically one of the meanings is obvious, given the context, whereas the other may require more thought.
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  • U
    0
    Unregistered
    Imagine the Truman Show and Jim Carrie sings this about his wife.

    She hates him because she is only using him to sell commercials.
    He doesn't realize he's in a TV show and his marriage is in a sham.
    He has made a vow "until death do us part" and on one hand believes it's a real vow.
    On the other hand he things he should get out of a promise to God free card because the marriage is a fraud.
    For him familiarity breeds love but for her it breeds contempt and cuts him off more each day and makes ridiculous demands he must say "NO" to.
    I wouldn't want to be in the same Galaxy when he finally explodes.
    Add your reply
  • m
    0
    Michael Wheeler
    You guys are freaking ridiculous, this translation is far from correct. The intro is a double meaning he isn't sure about her. So you he's saying:

    "You have asked me,
    and I did not respond

    you want until death does us apart
    faithful for the rest of our days
    NO! NO!

    you want until death divorces us
    to love her even on bad days.
    NO! NO!"

    that is what is says, contextually and verbatim.

    I am a German American and lived in Germany 16 years. I am fluent in both languages.

    That is what the lyrics say. What he means can only be translated by the writer of the song. This song wasn't written to have deep meaning but to have bass and screaming.
    Add your reply
  • U
    - 1
    Unregistered
    The comment from May 24th is completely correct. I worked closely with German soldiers and German contractors in Afghanistan and because of How High the movie(where I first heard the song) I asked them what was the guy singing about and one guy played the song for me and broke and down and it's definitely you hate, he's definitely singing about oppression.

    You...
    You hate...
    You hate me...
    You hate me to say (reason with you)
    And I did not obey (I stood my ground)

    Will you until killed (leave this place)
    Be in support of "germany's (3rd riech) oppressive reign forever...

    Nooooooo (in English, Rammstein stated "NEVER!")

    Will you until killed be her (her is the 3rd reich) armed forces
    her supporter (not a defector), to remain inside her (or imprisoned for not complying)

    Nooooooo (in English, Rammstein stated "NEVER!")"
    Add your reply
  • U
    - 2
    Unregistered
    Try watching the English version, they clearly say you hate me to say and I will not obey! Reading into the true meaning of the song is another subject, but the words they use in English are most definitely NOT the words that this person translated them to be here! I've taken courses to learn German and have learned Italian and a bit of Spanish also (Pennsylvania if (or at least was) amazing when it came to the curriculum in middle school having the students learn Spanish, German, and French (French being the hardest for me for some reason). But learning those languages, each teacher made it a point to explain how meanings get lost in translation and there will be different translations to something depending on where in the country you are (which dialect they use) example: half of my family are from Sicily while the other half are from Naples and if you have my great grandparents from both sides sitting down together to translate something for you, they can argue about what the real meaning is because they use different dialects coming from different parts of Italy! It's actually quite humorous!
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  • U
    - 4
    Unregistered
    Oppression. The London-based, US/CIA/NSA/FBI/MI6/"Homeland (in)Security"-continued financial oppression of all who are not in their club. Rammstein prophetically writes of this threat, telling us that if we do not conquer it this time (early 21st century), we may be done, extinct, over with... Love to all who fight against tyranny, and those bankers who died with pieces of the truth.
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    Top meanings Post my meaning

    • U
      + 47
      Unregistered
      These lyrics are totally correct!
      Everybody who says they aren't probably have no idea of the... Read more →
    • U
      + 32
      Unregistered
      The misconception is by media at large. I have both the German version and the English version of... Read more →

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