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Rrrrr, sabor!
(Rrrrr, Flavor)

Oye como va, mi ritmo
Bueno pa' gozar, mulata
(Listen to my rhythm
Good for fun, mulata-
A woman of mixed race)

Oye como va, mi ritmo
Bueno pa' gozar, mulata
(Listen to my rhythm
Good for fun, mulata)

Oye como va, mi ritmo
Bueno pa' gozar, mulata
(Listen to my rhythm
Good for fun, mulata)

Oye como va, mi ritmo
Bueno pa' gozar, mulata
(Listen to my rhythm
Good for fun, mulata)



Lyrics taken from http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/santana/oye_como_va.html

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  • U
    +1
    UnregisteredMar 16, 2012 at 3:11 am
    No, no, no! "oye como va mi ritmo" means:

    "listen to my rhythm... "

    "bueno pa gozer mulata" means:

    "it is something good to enjoy my mulata"

    This second phrase cannot be translated literally to english. But the intent is that he is telling this woman of his apparent desire to let herself enjoy the sounds and thus become open to his overtures.
  • U
    +1
    UnregisteredFeb 29, 2012 at 4:29 am
    Spanish translation oye como va, mi ritmo. Hey this is how my rythm goes. Bueno pa gozar, mulata. Good to enjoy mixed music or could be referring to a mixed crowd of women. Mulata is actually a mixed girl, black and white/spanish, latina etc.. Remember the song was performed by tito puente who was originally cubano, cuban race is a mulata race of sorts. Cuban and african mixture, thus mulata women. Could also refer to a blend of music again cubano music is a mixture of cuban rthyms mixed with afro rythyms as well.
  • U
    0
    UnregisteredOct 17, 2011 at 1:40 am
    A lot of translators here are separating the lines.

    "oye come va mi ritmo" is one sentence, just because they sing is with a small pause after "oye come va" and "mi ritmo" doesn't mean in translation we should break it up.

    I would translate it as "listen to how my rhythm goes. "

    The same applies to "bueno para gozar mulata. " even though there's a small pause in the way it's sung - it's also only one sentence.

    "good for having fun with dark skinned ladies. "

    Too many of you take a literal meaning word for word and that's not what translation is.

    Translation is getting across the idea of the artist when he wrote it. Broken up it doesn't translate or make sense.
  • v
    0
    vizbitJan 27, 2011 at 12:06 pm
    Oye!
    Listen up, y'all !

    Como va mi ritmo ..bueno pa gozar
    To how great my rhythm is going/flowing, for your enjoyment

    (La música) mulata
    A mixed blend (for a mixed audience)
  • w
    0
    wizerdaveMay 25, 2010 at 3:00 am
    Well, it's actually "gozar" with a Z, and as others have translated it correctly, simply means to enjoy. Tito Puente, the author, was of Puerto Rican ancestry. In seven years of living in Puerto Rico and public school classes there I never heard the word used for anything more than simply to enjoy - in this case his rhythm, or have a good time listening to his music. I like the suggestion that mulata could refer, simbolically, to the mixed type of music. Makes sense.

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