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My sweet lord
Hm, my lord
Hm, my lord

I really want to see you
Really want to be with you
Really want to see you lord
But it takes so long, my lord

My sweet lord
Hm, my lord
Hm, my lord

I really want to know you
Really want to go with you
Really want to show you lord
That it wont take long, my lord (hallelujah)

My sweet lord (hallelujah)
Hm, my lord (hallelujah)
My sweet lord (hallelujah)

I really want to see you
Really want to see you
Really want to see you, lord
Really want to see you, lord
But it takes so long, my lord (hallelujah)

My sweet lord (hallelujah)
Hm, my lord (hallelujah)
My, my, my lord (hallelujah)

I really want to know you (hallelujah)
Really want to go with you (hallelujah)
Really want to show you lord (aaah)
That it wont take long, my lord (hallelujah)

Hmm (hallelujah)
My sweet lord (hallelujah)
My, my, lord (hallelujah)

Hm, my lord (hare krishna)
My, my, my lord (hare krishna)
Oh hm, my sweet lord (krishna, krishna)
Oh-uuh-uh (hare hare)

Now, I really want to see you (hare rama)
Really want to be with you (hare rama)
Really want to see you lord (aaah)
But it takes so long, my lord (hallelujah)

Hm, my lord (hallelujah)
My, my, my lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (krishna krishna)
My lord (hare hare)
Hm, hm (gurur brahma)
Hm, hm (gurur vishnu)
Hm, hm (gurur devo)
Hm, hm (maheshwara)
My sweet lord (gurur sakshaat)
My sweet lord (parabrahma)
My, my, my lord (tasmayi shree)
My, my, my, my lord (guruve namah)
My sweet lord (hare rama)

[fade:]

(hare krishna)
My sweet lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (krishna krishna)
My lord (hare hare)



Lyrics taken from http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/g/george_harrison/my_sweet_lord.html

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  • r
    +4
    Robin LatzmanMay 2, 2013 at 12:41 am
    At first George was reluctant to record his song because he was not sure if people would accepr the spiritual/religious connations of the song.
  • U
    +2
    UnregisteredMay 1, 2012 at 1:01 am
    I see goerge harrison as praying and talking with god, knowing there is so much to accomplish spiritually before the final merge with god - no matter what name he is called by. Spirituality is a gradual growth. By any name, god is god. He answers by all names and he was never land will never be limited by form or name, and george harriso recognized him as one in all. He was definitely very advanced spiritually and loved god. It is also my understanding that he loved bhagavahan sri sathya sai baba and he was a major inspiration in his life. Recently, a video of darshans of sri sathya sai baba was released with this song in the background. That showed his love and respect for him.
  • t
    +1
    TimBostonMar 30, 2011 at 2:03 pm
    I think with George it started off as traditional, as if it were a Christian song referring to the Lord as Jesus Christ. However, as in the Beatles tradition common with John and Paul, George's song takes a bit of a twist in the middle, saying that the Lord is Krishna and not Christ and in doing so making it a Krishna rather than a Christian song.
    It could have been symbolic in the way in which George was raised as a Christian and later rediscovered his own spirituality in Krishna.
    George had developed an interest in Indian philosophy in the mid 1960s. He had experimented with drugs, particularly LSD. Many users of LSD have a religious experience while intoxicated. They feel a oneness with God. George's wife, actress and model Patti Boyd, was also interested in transcendental meditation and convinced George to try TM with the Maharishi. In the spring of 1968 all of the Beatles went to India, but it was George who became the most influenced by TM.
    My personal opinion is that the Hare Krishnas are very aggressive in converting people to their religion. In the 1960s I can remember the Hare Krishnas were in the city converting hippies and this song came out in 1971 at the height of all of that.
    I like the Beatles like twist of the song. It starts off as Lord as in Jesus, but then it changes, twists into opening up the listener to other lords such as Krishna. You can think that Jesus and Krishna are one and the same or different. Whether it is hallelujah or hare krishna it is all the same.
    It is not anything sinister like getting people hooked on Hare Krishna. It is about showing how we are basically all the same, despite the outward appearances of being different.
    So you don't have to cover your kid's ears when it comes on the radio. And if they want to sing along with Hare Krishna they are not going to run off to an ashram. But they might be a bit friendlier to the Indian kids in their class and not treat them like they are strange and unusual. So it's not about getting a person hooked on anything but about recovery from the addictions of hate and preset prejudices.
  • U
    0
    UnregisteredNov 1, 2011 at 9:53 am
    This song reminds me of my mom and dad growing up, because they listened to beatles music. In fact, my grandmother has a british cousin and she gave me a shirt.

    In fact, she has several cousins.

    I think with george it started off as traditional, as if it were a christian song referring to the lord as jesus christ. However, as in the beatles tradition common with john and paul, george's song takes a bit of a twist in the middle, saying that the lord is krishna and not christ and in doing so making it a krishna rather than a christian song. It could have been symbolic in the way in which george was raised as a christian and later rediscovered his own spirituality in krishna. George had developed an interest in indian philosophy in the mid 1960s. He had experimented with drugs, particularly lsd. Many users of lsd have a religious experience while intoxicated. They feel a oneness with god. George's wife, actress and model patti boyd, was also interested in transcendental meditation and convinced george to try tm with the maharishi. In the spring of 1968 all of the beatles went to india, but it was george who became the most influenced by tm. My personal opinion is that the hare krishnas are very aggressive in converting people to their religion. In the 1960s i can remember the hare krishnas were in the city converting hippies and this song came out in 1971 at the height of all of that. I like the beatles like twist of the song. It starts off as lord as in jesus, but then it changes, twists into opening up the listener to other lords such as krishna. You can think that jesus and krishna are one and the same or different. Whether it is hallelujah or hare krishna it is all the same. It is not anything sinister like getting people hooked on hare krishna. It is about showing how we are basically all the same, despite the outward appearances of being different. So you don't have to cover your kid's ears when it comes on the radio. And if they want to sing along with hare krishna they are not going to run off to an ashram. But they might be a bit friendlier to the indian kids in their class and not treat them like they are strange and unusual. So it's not about getting a person hooked on anything but about recovery from the addictions of hate and preset prejudices.
  • U
    0
    UnregisteredOct 27, 2011 at 3:58 pm
    I think he is trying to convey that he does not want to focus on the temporal things in this life, but to build his spirit, and to become closer to god. I believe he was saying that all roads lead to god, no matter what your "religion", it is more about faith, than dogma. Krishna is a sanskrit word for god, so no matter what you practice, practice it with your total being.

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