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It's a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack
You taught me all I know and I'll never look back
It's a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack

You took a colored ribbon from out of the sky
And taught me how to use it as the years went by
To tie up all your problems and make them look neat
And then to sell them to the people in the street

It's a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack
You taught me all I know and I'll never look back
It's a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack

I saw right through the way you started teachin' me now
So some day soon you could get to use me somehow
I thank you very much and though you've been very kind
But I'd better move along before you change my mind

It's a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack
You know how I feel as if I'll never come back
It's a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack

You taught me all the things the way you'd like them to be
But I'd like to see if other people agree
It's all very int'resting the way you disguise
But I'd like to see the world through my own eyes

It's a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack
No hard feelin's if I never come back
You're a very strange man and I thank you, Master Jack

You're a very strange man and I thank you, Master Jack
You're a very strange man aren't, Master Jack



Lyrics taken from http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/f/four_jacks_and_a_jill/master_jack_lyrics.html

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    UnregisteredOct 6, 2011 at 8:56 pm
    I think that this song is a backlash by English speaking South Africans against the perceived treatment of South Africa and Rhodesia by the uk aka Master (Union) Jack and how they were moving against a perceived unshakable loyalty to the uk and finding common ground with Afrikaans speakers. 'It's a strange world' yet no one understands are often the way that many Saffas feel to those who condemn Apartheid yet never lived in rsa. Apart from this the lyrics speak of a thanks yet a need to move away from Jack as many English speakers did feeling alienated by the uk.
    There are also several visual references such as the two lions (symbolic of British coats of arms) being faded out in favour of two Bokke (traditionally associated with rsa crests). Also look at the colours they're wearing- orange, blue and white; synomomous with the rsa flag from the 1920's-1994.
    In short it's about the identity, yet rememberence of the English speakers in an independent and isolated rsa.
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    UnregisteredMay 13, 2012 at 4:00 pm
    It's an "elisa doolittle" type relationship. An older. Wiser "master" finds a young girl, begins molding her, teaching, her about life, then. Love (i saw right thru the way you started teaching me love, and how you hoped to someday use it somehow. " come on people, it's not rocket science. He taught her many thngs because she was so young, but she wasn't too naive to realize he was actually grooming her to be his s** slave.
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    UnregisteredNov 2, 2011 at 5:07 am
    The song is by a south african band and is about apartheid. How the youth were sold the idea and couldn't question as master jack told them it was 'god's law'. I believe they left the country shortly after this song possibly fearing the master's wrath and to live a different life where churches don't preach loving your neighbour, except if he's a kaffir. But it was never banned, master was that bright - black beauty was banned even though it was a story about a horse.
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    UnregisteredOct 18, 2011 at 12:33 am
    My initial impression of the song was that it was about life in the victorian era, in london, england. I pictured in my mind the setting of the movie oliver. I think I had this impression, because in this day and age, I don't think anyone calls someone master, although I could be wrong. Back in victorian england, and I think even in england today, there is a cast system. I pictured a poor young girl, with no family or other means of support, a street urchin, being taken in by a schiester, for whom she was at his beck and call. He instructed her on how to steal and swindle unsuspecting citizens, rich ones likely, and tossed her a few tuppins for her pay.
    The song has an eeriness about it that is unsettling, rather frightening to me. It reminded me of a relationship I had for ten years with my boyfriend who was nearly ten years older than I. He believed that what he said was law, and what I said went in one of his ear's and out the other.
    I did wonder how this master would allow this girl to leave after being him any lenth of time.
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    madsandyalmondDec 20, 2009 at 3:23 am
    This song was written in the early hippy days when it was popular to be a cynic. Perhaps the most popular cynic guru was Tim Leary, presently a peddler of investments. Hearing this song I always pictured a cynic guru who had fallen for his pupil. The only problem was he had taught her to be a really good cynic; one no longer able to understand love, and so, she was sure the love Master Jack offered was just a method to get to use her some how. A sad, sad song from the era when we first became cynics. Peace man, make love and try and believe it's real.

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